Famous people from London


This renowned British film director and producer, who made his career in Hollywood, was the master of suspense and a pioneer of the thriller genre. Born and raised in Leytonstone (London today), he attended St. Ignatius College in Enfield, London. He became a draftsman and advertising designer; however in 1920 he got a job at the Islington Studios in London, and later at Gainsborough Pictures. His film debut came in the silent era; 'The Pleasure Garden',
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In those days [pre-World War II] for a Mancunian to visit [London] was an exercise in condescension. London was a day behind Manchester in the arts, in commercial cunning, in economic philosophy... Manchester was generous and London was not.” Burgess in his autobiography, ‘Little Wilson and Big God'

Above all, Burgess was a highly prolific novelist. His first novel, ‘A Vision of Battlements’ was published in 1965; however, it was not until 1956 and the publication of the first tome in his Malayan trilogy,
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It was a foggy day in London, and the fog was heavy and dark. Animate London, with smarting eyes and irritated lungs, was blinking, wheezing, and choking; inanimate London was a sooty spectre, divided in purpose between being visible and invisible, and so being wholly neither.

Recognised as one of the outstanding English prose writers, known for his opposition to social injustice and inequality, Dickens is the author of many novels that are shining examples of his genius.
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This 19-Century painter and poet was born in London as Gabriel Charles Dante Rossetti to a family of literary artists; his father was an Italian scholar, who had emigrated to England. Dante, as he preferred to be named due to his fascination with Dante Alighieri, remains particularly famous as a co-founder of the 'Pre-Raphaelite Broderhood', which he formed together with John Everett Millais and William Holman Hunt. The artists dedicated themselves to the Medieval style of painting,
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The British engineer was a pioneering car manufacturer, who, along with Charles Stewart Rolls, founded the automobile company known worldwide as Rolls-Royce. He was born in Alwalton near Peterborough and was the youngest of five children. The family moved to London, but Royce's father died in 1872 and young Royce, after receiving only one year of formal schooling, went to work selling newspapers. In 1878, he began an apprenticeship with the Great Northern Railway company. Six years later,
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Born in New York, Henry James was a renowned American novelist, who was educated in Europe, and in 1869 he settled in England. His father was a theologian and his brother, William James, became the philosopher and psychologist. In 1864, he his first short story, 'A Tragedy of Error', was published anonymously. Throughout his literary career he produced different genres; novels, short stories, literary criticism, travel writing, as well as biographies and an autobiography. Among his 22 novels the topic of the cultural differences between the American and European people was common.
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This British writer is primarily associated with the character of James Bond which he created. He was also a journalist, and during World War II he served as a Naval Officer. Born in Mayfair, London to a prominent family, he received his education from Durnford School in Dorset, Eton College as well as from the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. He was also sent to Kitzbühel in Austria, Munich University and University of Geneva, to improve his German and French.
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One most influential names in the world of physics, Newton importance is due to his laws and discoveries and he remains on the list of the greatest scientists of all time. He was born in Woolsthorpe-by-Colsterworth in the county of Lincolnshire, where he received his primary education. At the age of 19, he was sent to Cambridge University. As the college was closed for 18 months due to The Great Plague, Newton studied back home, making the observation of an apple falling from a tree,
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Sir Laurence Oliver was one of the most acclaimed English actors of the 20th Century and was a holder of many international film awards, including Oscars and Golden Globe. Due to his achievements in British theatre he was knighted in 1947 and made baron in 1970. Born in Dorking, Surrey, he was educated firstly at the All Saint's Choir School in London, later at the Elsie Fogerty's Central School of Speech Training, and at the Dramatic Arts St Edward's School in Oxford.
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For over four decades, she has been a beloved British songwriter, actress and singer recognised for her strong characteristic voice. She was born in the London suburb of Hampstead to the Baroness Eva Erisso and a British military officer and college professor. She was a student of St Joseph's Convent School in Reading, Berkshire, where she moved with her divorced mother. She was also a member of Progress Theatre. Her singing career began around 1964 when she performed in coffee houses.
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Born Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley in the London area of Somers Town, she remains renowned as Mary Shelley, the author of 'Frankenstein'. She was the second wife to the Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her mother Mary Wollstonecraft – feminist, educator and writer, died only ten days after Shelly's birth. Some time after, her father married the widow Mary Jane Clairmont. Having been exceptionally well educated at home, Mary was encouraged to write, and some claim a children's book Mounseer Nongtongpaw from 1808 to be her first attempt.
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You find no man at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.

Dr. Samuel Johnson's gifts as a poet, essayist, journalist and critic made him one of the most conspicuous men of 18th-Century life and letters. His translation of Pope's 'Messiah' into Latin appeared in 1731. His other important works include 'A Voyage to Abbyssinia' (1735),
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I had neither kith nor kin in England, and was therefore as free as air-- or as free as an income of eleven shillings and sixpence a day will permit a man to be. Under such circumstances, I naturally gravitated to London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained.

While best remembered as the writer who brought Sherlock Holmes to life, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle also wrote 'The Hound of Baskervilles',
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This renowned American confessional poet and novelist, was born in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. During the Great Depression the family moved to Winthrop, where 8-year old Sylvia published her first poem in the children's section of the Boston Herald. She attended Smith College, from which she graduated with honours in 1955. Because of her suicide attempts, she was placed in a mental institution for a short time. Later, when she obtained a Fullbright scholarship, Plath continued her education at Cambridge University,
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And I'd been playing it then for ten months – nine months in London and one month in New York. Every single night I'm nervous.

This beautiful English actress is particularly remembered for her two film roles, Scarlett O'Hara in 'Gone with the Wind' and Blanche DuBois in 'A Streetcar Named Desire', especially considering that for both of them she won Academy Awards for Best Actress. She also played Blanche on the stages of West End in London.
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London itself perpetually attracts, stimulates, gives me a play and a story and a poem, without any trouble, save that of moving my legs through the streets... To walk alone in London is the greatest rest.

Born in London as Adeline Virginia Stephen, she became one of the most recognised English novelists of Modernism. She was raised by a literate family, as her father Leslie Stephen was a famous Victorian writer and mountaineer as well as the widower of William Thackeray's daughter.
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I wandered through each chartered street, Near where the chartered Thames does flow, A mark in every face I meet, Marks of weakness, marks of woe.

London-born William Blake was a poet, artist and an illustrator, who claimed to have visionary powers and was deeply interested in mysticism. Raised in a numerous family of English Dissenters, he was educated at home, where the Bible was commonly read. By 1772, he became an apprentice engraver at the Great Queen Street,
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Shakespeare, author of about 38 plays, definitely changed the state of the theatrical world. Although many details of his life remain a mystery, his works have been translated into numerous languages, and have defined the standards of literature. Born in the town of Stratford-on-Avon, he went to the local grammar school, and probably became a teacher. He was only eighteen when he married Anne Hathaway. About three years later the couple and their children moved to London.
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Said about the city: “Hitler expects to terrorise and cow the people of this mighty city… Little does he know the spirit of the British nation, or the tough fibre of the Londoners.

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, the British Prime Minister, a holder of the Nobel Prize in Literature, is undoubtedly considered the most influential person of his decade. Born in Blenheim Palace in Woodstock, Oxfordshire to a 19-Century Conservative minister, Randolph Churchill, he served in the British Army as a young men.
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