Famous people from Dublin


In my eyes Dublin has always been a tramway. I used to have to ride the tram for one hour and a half every morning and night. And it was always raining.

Arthur Guinness was a superior Irish brewer and a crafty businessman. He is known as the founder of the empire that bears his name: Guinness. However, it is not well known that he was also a humanitarian. In 1759, after several years of brewing only a few pints of beer or ale a day,
 More »
Being Irish is very much a part of who I am. I take it everywhere with me.

Colin Farrell was born in Castleknock, Dublin and has achieved the status of a rising Hollywood star. Despite his current status, Farrell was the son of Irish football player, Eamon Farrell, and young Farrell first showed talent, not as an actor, but as a goalkeeper for Castleknock Celtic. He was a student at Gaiety School of Drama,
 More »
This Dublin-born painter explored the subjects of misery and loneliness. His paintings are filled with unimaginably disfigured bodies and fantastically deformed faces. Of his many works, the better known are ‘Watercolour’ (1929), ‘Portrait’ (1932), ‘Abstraction’ (1936), ‘Figure with Meat’ (1954), and a magnum opus, his triptych ‘Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion’ (1944). He was a self-taught artist, but among his influences were Picasso, Velazquez and Van Gogh. Bacon's retrospective was shown in 1962 at the Tate Gallery in London.
 More »
A certain flippant utile derision and belittlement that confuses the noble and serious with the base and ludicrous seems to me peculiar to Dublin.

Shaw was a man of many passions. He was a chief figure in 20th-Century theatre, a literary critic, socialist spokesman and one of the most popular public speakers of his time. He is, however, primarily famous for authoring over 50 plays. Several of them, like ‘Major Barbara’, indicated that socialism could help solve the dilemmas posed by capitalism.
 More »
I want to give a picture of Dublin so complete that if the city one day suddenly disappeared from the earth it could be reconstructed out of my book.

Although not prolific, Joyce is regarded as one of the most important stream-of-consciousness novelist and influential writers of the 20th Century. Writers with the calibre such as Samuel Beckett, Salman Rushdie, William Burrough, Mairtin O’ Cadhain and Thomas Pynchon, to name a few, have been greatly influenced by Joyce's unique and innovative use of language in such masterpieces as the 700-page ‘Ulysses’ (1922) and ‘Finneganns Wake’ (1939).
 More »
No men in Dublin go to taverns who are worth sitting with.

Jonathan Swift, the principal prose satirist of the English language, fruitful poet and essayist, political pamphleteer and dean of St Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin (1713 – 1745), owes his fame to his timeless novel ‘Gulliver's Travels’ (1726). It is still cherished by children all around the world as an adventure story; however, Swift intended it to be an adult satire open to a variety of interpretations.
 More »
Dublin is a city full of humour, Dublin is a city full of wit. Dublin is a city full of buskers, playing old Waterboys hits.

Yeats's long and prosperous career was crowned in 1923 by the Nobel Prize “for his always inspired poetry, which in a highly artistic form gives expression to the spirit of a whole nation.” Amongst his most famous works are ‘Easter 1916’, ‘The Second Coming’ and ‘Sailing to Byzantium’. Besides being a poet,
 More »